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Kathleen Meyer

Kathleen Meyer

     . . . longtime river guide, sea kayaker, draft horse teamster, and author of the international bestselling outdoor guide How to Shit in the Woods: An Environmentally Sound Approach to a Lost Art (with more than 3 million copies sold in 8 languages) and the Wild West memoir Barefoot Hearted: A Wild Life Among Wildlife.

4th Edition!!!

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All tastefully-written illuminations, rants, and questions are welcome. (Tasteful, of course, is elastic in this case, but we’ll try to mind most of our manners.

Feel free to address prickly problems, toss out new ideas, comment with candor on products and locations, regale success stories, network with fervor, and—above all—dream up backcountry sanitation that achieves the ultimate in ecological and aesthetic preservation of those precious places in our shrinking wild.


Shooting the Shit
will post in a relaxed fashion, leaving us all time for rivers, mountains, oceans, and that old thing “making a living.” I realize that anything snail-like these days is bucking the trend but the offbeat path, now and again, screams to be followed. How I know it!
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Currently not available. I’m transferring to a new system. Please bear with!
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Currently not available. I’m transferring to a new system. Please bear with!
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A Place of Easement & Covid Crap
By Kathleen Meyer, July 2021

What a sweet site, sight, and delight!

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Photo is from Canyon REO’s website

Oh how I want to step right into this photo and settle down on the seat—no flushing racket here, no bowl cleaning, no plumbing disasters—nothing but tranquility and magnificence for meditating on the divine worth of our Mother Earth. A “place of easement,” as the Elizabethans called it. A D-Can, as Canyon REO calls it.

Now the disturbing news. With Covid’s arrival last year, virus-avoiders began discovering the grandeur of Nature and its unbeatable fresh air. Here in Montana, our downtown streets and sidewalks were positively empty, while trailhead parking lots overflowed. Sauntering into the mountains, seeking serenity, felt more like hitting LA freeways at rush hour. AND IT’S WORSE THIS YEAR. I’m receiving a load of reports. All manner of our precious wild places—mountain trails, backcountry campsites, lakesides, river banks—are under assault by an inordinate amount of toilet trash. Blights of blowing baby wipes, half-buried toilet paper, and raw piles of poop, all befouling landscapes, clearly indicate the newcomers are unschooled in the basics of outback etiquette and sanitation protocol.

One answer—easier and faster and wiser than instituting wide-spread regs and a massive potty patrol—is a little “wild” promotion of the new edition of my guidebook, thoroughly revised, with a
Foreword by renowned author and climate activist Bill McKibben. Every backcountry newbie needs a copy of How to Shit in the Woods!

Please join me in doing all that we can to encourage others to respect and protect these sacred places. Contact your local independent bookstores and outdoor stores, to share the growing problem and inquire as to whether they’re carrying/showcasing! this bestselling guidebook:
How to Shit in the Woods? And . . . if not, would they please!

D-Can

For those organizing a private river trip through the Grand Canyon, or a trip on the San Juan River or Salt River, check out Canyon REO (River Equipment Outfitters)—www.canyonreo.com—as a source for both rentals and sales of river rafting gear. They specialize in private-trip rental equipment. Shown above is their D-Can carry-out toilet system. Find its description below, a combined excerpt from the 4th edition of How to Shit in the Woods (gathered from pages 50 and 53, and the intro paragraphs to washable-reusable carry-out systems).

The D-Can system includes a 25 mm army surplus ammo can (17½ x 10 x 14½ inches tall), which is 2½ inches wider and more stable than the 20 mm and 1 inch wider than the 30 mm. Its toilet seat assembly has a flat-closing, no-air-gap lid (to keep from attracting flies), mounted on a slide-on aluminum top for use in camp. Dry weight is 23 pounds, with a capacity of 70 user-days (“hero use” up to 80). The term user-day is defined as 1 person’s deposits over the course of 1 day. In other words, 50 user-days can mean 1 person for 50 days, or 10 people for 5 days. Get it? Should you purchase this system, you will also need one 20 mm can in which to store the seat and potty supplies while on the river. The D-Can is compatible with the Scat Machine, which will dump and clean your ammo can and almost hand it back to you. Or buy an ordinary funnel for use at RV dumping stations and then plan to apply elbow grease to clean everything afterward.

But let’s talk about the D-Can
rental! For $3.00 per day it includes the D-Can with seat assembly and the 20 mm can needed for storage while on the water and a “day toilet”—National Park Service required—consisting of a 50 caliber ammo can with kitty litter. A Wishy-Washy Hand Washer station rents for an additional $35 per trip. “But here’s the best: for a measly $30, at the end of your trip, you’re allowed to return a chock-full can to Canyon REO, twirl on your heel and waltz away.”
Latest praise for the 4th edition (or click All the Praise) . . .
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“Kathleen Meyer is a treasure: In these days of disappearing wilderness and an unlivable hot earth, I can’t imagine a more trusted guide for the woods and the wild.”

—Doug Peacock, world’s most tenacious protector of grizzly bears, author of Walking It Off: A Veteran’s Chronicle of War and Wilderness.

“As a philosophy of life built on the profound interconnection between self and nature, How to Shit in the Woods is clearly the definitive text on the subject.”

Gail D. Storey, author of the award-winning outdoor
memoir
I Promise Not to Suffer: A Fool  for Love
Hikes the Pacific Crest Trail

“Read it as a guide but also as a metaphor . . . immensely
practical, in deep and powerful ways.”
[Taken from the foreword.]

Bill McKibben, author and activist and founder of  350.0rg,
the international climate crisis organization. His latest
book is
Falter: Has the   Human Game Begun
        to Play Itself Out?

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“Kathleen Meyer is a treasure: In these days of disappearing wilderness and an unlivable hot earth, I can’t imagine a more trusted guide for the woods and the wild.”

—Doug Peacock, author of Walking
It Off: A Veteran’s Chronicle of
War and Wilderness
,
and so many more.

“As a philosophy of life built on the profound interconnection between self and nature, How to Shit in the Woods is clearly the definitive text on the subject.”

Gail D. Storey, author of the
award-winning outdoor memoir

I PromiseNot to Suffer: A
Fool  for Love Hikes the
Pacific Crest Trail

“Read it as a guide but also as a metaphor . . . immensely practical, in deep and powerful ways.” [Taken from the foreword.]

Bill McKibben, author and activist
and founder of 350.0rg, the
international climate crisis
organization. His latest
book is
Falter:Has the
Human Game Begun
to Play Itself Out?

Add a Comment by emailing me your thoughts or use Contact the Author. (The auto comment system drove me nuts!) Do place quotes around the words of your comment, and I’ll happily hand-post them. Invent a handle, if you prefer, instead of your name.
Add a Comment by emailing me your thoughts or use Contact the Author. (The auto comment system drove me nuts!) Do place quotes around the words of your comment, and I’ll happily hand-post them. Invent a handle, if you prefer, instead of your name.
EMAILED COMMENTS
WilderStill
No kidding. See the article in the July High Country News, p. 16, Public Lands Inundated. “Human waste and toilet paper . . . alongside photogenic lakes and streams.” Shocking article. Let’s get on it.
Kathleen
Ugh! Let’s do!
ComingUpRoses
Hey, Kathleen, wonderful praise, and so true! I’ll be on the phone, right off. Teach everybody!
Kathleen
Yes, wonderful! I’m deeply, humbly grateful.
Udigumgal
Calling all dendrophiles! After this last year of challenges in the emotional, physical, and spiritual realms, your book is a rallying call (once again) to get out into nature and reboot oneself! The Great Mother is calling those with the ears, eyes, and hearts, and respect for her most sacred places. Remember, SHE has the last word and does not take any “sh*t” in any way, shape, or form. Pardon the pun, Kathleen! Onward always!
Kathleen
Gooo good woman, and dear TreeSister! No prob—my kind of pun!
Carol Newman
I’m grateful for this handy, updated, and important guide that improves the quality of our backcountry experiences. Thanks, Kathleen.
Kathleen
My gratitude is for your sisterly support and long friendship. We need to plan a watery trip!
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Happy Earth Day!
By Kathleen Meyer, April 22, 2021
We have only one home to cherish, our Mother. The air waves and screens today are full of news and love on her behalf. This 10 minute video, just coming to my attention, is not to be missed. Add it to your viewing!


A Blast From The Past

From the 1970s, when love for a river that’s steadily carving through an ancient limestone canyon also carved out career destinies. Particularly one man’s, whose deep-heart-dedication to acts of protection and restoration (over almost 50 years now) inspired so many to follow along their own paths to protection-activism.

“The Voice of a River” is his story in a ten-minute video—put together for Earth Day by My Green Pod in the UK. As a young river rat, Mark DuBois, internalized immense “connection” and love for the natural treasures of the Stanislaus River canyon, enough to put his life on the line for its survival. Though over the long haul, it was adopting a rudimentary process of “learn-as-you-go” . . . through brutal defeats and joyful uplifts, which together served to transform his voice into an intent, effective, and enduring protector—expanding eventually to worldwide rivers and the planet. Inspiration and empowerment for everyone! wanting to developed the strength and courage to continue.

Link to “Voice of a River,” partially narrated by Mark’s wife Clare, founder of TreeSisters: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OQkEC08nTI8

Sacred river blessings upon you, Mark.
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Mark Dubois

My Green Pod, a green/sustainability movement, producing a monthly insert in the Guardian newspaper.

TreeSisters, global reforestation.
Add a Comment! The auto comment system drove me nuts! So please email your thoughts to me or at Contact the Author. Do place quotes around the words of your comment, and I’ll happily hand-post them. Suggest a handle, if you prefer, instead of your name.
Happy Earth Day!
By Kathleen Meyer, April 22, 2021
We have only one home to cherish, our Mother. The air waves and screens today are full of news and love on her behalf. This 10 minute video, just coming to my attention, is not to be missed. Add it to your viewing!


A Blast From The Past

From the 1970s, when love for a river that’s steadily carving through an ancient limestone canyon also carved out career destinies. Particularly one man’s, whose deep-heart-dedication to acts of protection and restoration (over almost 50 years now) inspired so many to follow along their own paths to protection-activism.

“The Voice of a River” is his story in a ten-minute video—put together for Earth Day by My Green Pod in the UK. As a young river rat, Mark DuBois, internalized immense “connection” and love for the natural treasures of the Stanislaus River canyon, enough to put his life on the line for its survival. Though over the long haul, it was adopting a rudimentary process of “learn-as-you-go” . . . through brutal defeats and joyful uplifts, which together served to transform his voice into an intent, effective, and enduring protector—expanding eventually to worldwide rivers and the planet. Inspiration and empowerment for everyone! wanting to developed the strength and courage to continue.

Link to “Voice of a River,” partially narrated by Mark’s wife Clare, founder of TreeSisters: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OQkEC08nTI8

Sacred river blessings upon you, Mark.
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My Green Pod, a green/sustainability movement, producing a monthly insert in the Guardian newspaper.

TreeSisters, global reforestation.
Add a Comment! The auto comment system drove me nuts! Please email me your thoughts at Contact the Author. Do place quotes around the words of your comment, and I’ll happily hand-post them. Suggest a handle, if you prefer, instead of your name.
EMAILED COMMENTS
Udigumgal
Oh how this has taken me back to earlier (and wilder!) days. Many spent on the Stanislaus, three forks of it, and rivers south and north. It was my first adventure to CA right out of high school in 1972, full of energy, wide eyed and ready for whatever came my way. Never met Mark, however, we would have been kindred spirits for sure! What a beautiful, beautiful river! Thank you Kathleen for the looking glass into the past . . .
Kathleen
We must have just slid or paddled past each other. Sooo happy to have eventually crossed paths with a dear river sister.
Liz Cain
That video is fabulous! I cried all the way through. I was devastated to see the before and after footage of the Stanislaus River. It felt like losing a piece of my heart.
Kathleen
Oh, Liz . . . and this from someone who never saw the river, swam its waters, crawled all over its terrain and caves. Astoundingly, there were many in the 70s who worked tirelessly to save it without having touch it. The river somehow touched them from afar.
WilderStill
I had no idea, before my time. Sending huge gratitude to Mark, for his choosing such a life. And to those who followed, and will follow. An aha moment of creative insight for when we stand tall, roll, paddle, gather, and persist in preservation and restoration. Thanks to My Green Pod and Kathleen for posting this.
Kathleen
Oh, Wild—you got it! Onward we go . . .
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Add a Comment! The auto comment system drove me nuts! So please email your thoughts to me or use Contact the Author. Do place quotes around the words of your comment, and I’ll happily hand-post them. Invent a handle, if you prefer, instead of your name.
Add a Comment! The auto comment system drove me nuts! So please email your thoughts to me or use Contact the Author. Do place quotes around the words of your comment, and I’ll happily hand-post them. Invent a handle, if you prefer, instead of your name.
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Kathleen Meyer

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A Place of Easement & Covid Crap
By Kathleen Meyer, July 2021

What a sweet site, sight, and delight!

Stacks Image 7354

Photo from Canyon REO’s website

Oh how I want to step right into this photo and settle down on the seat—no flushing racket here, no bowl cleaning, no plumbing disasters—nothing but tranquility and magnificence for meditating on the divine worth of our Mother Earth. A “place of easement,” as the Elizabethans called it. A D-Can, as Canyon REO calls it.

Now the disturbing news. With Covid’s arrival last year, virus-avoiders began discovering the grandeur of Nature and its unbeatable fresh air. Here in Montana, our downtown streets and sidewalks were positively empty, while trailhead parking lots overflowed. Sauntering into the mountains, seeking serenity, felt more like hitting LA freeways at rush hour. AND IT’S WORSE THIS YEAR. I’m receiving a load of reports. All manner of our precious wild places—mountain trails, backcountry campsites, lakesides, river banks—are under assault by an inordinate amount of toilet trash. Blights of blowing baby wipes, half-buried toilet paper, and raw piles of poop, all befouling landscapes, clearly indicate the newcomers are unschooled in the basics of outback etiquette and sanitation protocol.

One answer—easier and faster and wiser than instituting wide-spread regs and a massive potty patrol—is a little “wild” promotion of the new edition of my guidebook, thoroughly revised, with a
Foreword by renowned author and climate activist Bill McKibben. Every backcountry newbie needs a copy of How to Shit in the Woods!

Please join me in doing all that we can to encourage others to respect and protect these sacred places. Contact your local independent bookstores and outdoor stores, to share the growing problem and inquire as to whether they’re carrying/showcasing! this bestselling guidebook:
How to Shit in the Woods? And . . . if not, would they please!

D-Can

Organizing a private river trip through the Grand Canyon, or a trip on the San Juan River or Salt River? Check out Canyon REO (River Equipment Outfitters)—www.canyonreo.com—a source for both rentals and sales of river rafting gear. They specialize in private-trip rental equipment. Shown above is their D-Can carry-out toilet system. Find its description below, a combined excerpt from the 4th edition of How to Shit in the Woods (gathered from pages 50 and 53, and the intro paragraphs to washable-reusable carry-out systems).

The D-Can system includes a 25 mm army surplus ammo can (17½ x 10 x 14½ inches tall), which is 2½ inches wider and more stable than the 20 mm and 1 inch wider than the 30 mm. Its toilet seat assembly has a flat-closing, no-air-gap lid (to keep from attracting flies), mounted on a slide-on aluminum top for use in camp. Dry weight is 23 pounds, with a capacity of 70 user-days (“hero use” up to 80). The term user-day is defined as 1 person’s deposits over the course of 1 day. In other words, 50 user-days can mean 1 person for 50 days, or 10 people for 5 days. Get it? Should you purchase this system, you will also need one 20 mm can in which to store the seat and potty supplies while on the river. The D-Can is compatible with the Scat Machine, which will dump and clean your ammo can and almost hand it back to you. Or buy an ordinary funnel for use at RV dumping stations and then plan to apply elbow grease to clean everything afterward.

But let’s talk about the D-Can
rental! For $3.00 per day it includes the D-Can with seat assembly and the 20 mm can needed for storage while on the water and a “day toilet”—National Park Service required—consisting of a 50 caliber ammo can with kitty litter. A Wishy-Washy Hand Washer station rents for an additional $35 per trip. But here’s the best: for a measly $30, at the end of your trip, you’re allowed to return a chock-full can to Canyon REO, twirl on your heel and waltz away.
Latest praise for the 4th edition (or click All the Praise):
Stacks Image 7433

“Kathleen Meyer is a treasure: In these days of disappearing wilderness and an unlivable hot earth, I can’t imagine a more trusted guide for the woods and the wild.”

—Doug Peacock, author of Walking
It Off: A Veteran’s Chronicle of
War and Wilderness
,
and so many more.

“As a philosophy of life built on the profound interconnection between self and nature, How to Shit in the Woods is clearly the definitive text on the subject.”

Gail D. Storey, author of the
award-winning outdoor memoir

I PromiseNot to Suffer: A
Fool  for Love Hikes the
Pacific Crest Trail

“Read it as a guide but also as a metaphor . . . immensely practical, in deep and powerful ways.” [Taken from the foreword.]

Bill McKibben, author and activist
and founder of 350.0rg, the
international climate crisis
organization. His latest
book is
Falter:Has the
Human Game Begun
to Play Itself Out?

Another way to help: Adopt the habit of purchasing books from your local Mom & Pop bookstore, or from mine—Chapter One Book Store, which is well stock with my guide. Amazon, right now, is what’s wrong with the world.
Add a Comment by emailing me your thoughts or use Contact the Author. (The auto comment system drove me nuts!) Do place quotes around the words of your comment, and I’ll happily hand-post them. Invent a handle, if you prefer, instead of your name.
EMAILED COMMENTS
WilderStill
No kidding. Mentioned in the article in the July High Country News, p. 16, Public Lands Inundated. “Human waste and toilet paper . . . alongside photogenic lakes and streams.” Shocking article. Let’s get on it.
Kathleen
Ugh! Let’s do!
ComingUpRoses
Hey, Kathleen, wonderful praise, and so true! I’ll be on the phone, right off. Teach everybody!
Kathleen
Yes, wonderful! I’m deeply, humbly grateful.
Udigumgal
Calling all dendrophiles! After this last year of challenges in the emotional, physical, and spiritual realms, your book is a rallying call (once again) to get out into nature and reboot oneself! The Great Mother is calling those with the ears, eyes, and hearts, and respect for her most sacred places. Remember, SHE has the last word and does not take any “sh*t” in any way, shape, or form. Pardon the pun, Kathleen! Onward always!
Kathleen
Gooo good woman, and dear TreeSister! No prob—my kind of pun!
Carol Newman
I’m grateful for this handy, updated, and important guide that improves the quality of our backcountry experiences. Thanks, Kathleen.
Kathleen
My gratitude is for your sisterly support and long friendship. We need to plan a watery trip!
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Happy Earth Day!
By Kathleen Meyer, April 22, 2021
We have only one home to cherish, our Mother. Today the air waves and screens are full of news and love on her behalf. This 10 minute video, just coming to my attention, is not to be missed. Add it to your viewing!


A Blast From The Past

From the 1970s, when love for a river that’s steadily carving through an ancient limestone canyon also carved out career destinies. Particularly one man’s, whose deep-heart-dedication to acts of protection and restoration (over almost 50 years now) inspired so many to follow along their own paths to protection-activism.

“The Voice of a River” is his story in a ten-minute video—put together for Earth Day by My Green Pod in the UK. As a young river rat, Mark DuBois, internalized immense “connection” and love for the natural treasures of the Stanislaus River canyon, enough to put his life on the line for its survival. Though over the long haul, it was adopting a rudimentary process of “learn-as-you-go” . . . through brutal defeats and joyful uplifts, which together served to transform his voice into an intent, effective, and enduring protector—expanding eventually to worldwide rivers and the planet. Inspiration and empowerment for everyone! wanting to developed the strength and courage to continue.


Link to “Voice of a River,” partially narrated by Mark’s wife Clare, founder of TreeSisters: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OQkEC08nTI8

Sacred river blessings upon you, Mark.
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Mark Dubois

My Green Pod, a green/sustainability movement, producing a monthly insert in the Guardian newspaper.

TreeSisters, global reforestation.
Add a Comment! The auto comment system drove me nuts! So please email your thoughts to me or at Contact the Author. Do place quotes around the words of your comment, and I’ll happily hand-post them. Suggest a handle, if you prefer, instead of your name.
EMAILED COMMENTS
Udigumgal
Oh how this has taken me back to earlier (and wilder!) days. Many spent on the Stanislaus, three forks of it, and rivers south and north. It was my first adventure to CA right out of high school in 1972, full of energy, wide eyed and ready for whatever came my way. Never met Mark, however, we would have been kindred spirits for sure! What a beautiful, beautiful river! Thank you Kathleen for the looking glass into the past . . .
Kathleen
We must have just slid or paddled past each other. Sooo happy to have eventually crossed paths with a dear river sister.
Liz Cain
That video is fabulous! I cried all the way through. I was devastated to see the before and after footage of the Stanislaus River. It felt like losing a piece of my heart.
Kathleen
Oh, Liz . . . and this from someone who never saw the river, swam its waters, crawled all over its terrain and caves. Astoundingly, there were many in the 70s who worked tirelessly to save it without having touch it. The river somehow touched them from afar.
WilderStill
I had no idea, before my time. Sending huge gratitude to Mark, for his choosing such a life. And to those who followed, and will follow. An aha moment of creative insight for when we stand tall, roll, paddle, gather, and persist in preservation and restoration. Thanks to My Green Pod and Kathleen for posting this.
Kathleen
Oh, Wild—you got it! Onward we go . . .
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Masthead photo: “Sunrise over Sea of Cortez,” by James “Diego” Hatfield
© 2011 by Author Kathleen Meyer  •  All Rights Reserved 
Website design by RapidRiver.us

Masthead photo: “Sunrise over Sea of Cortez,”
by James “Diego” Hatfield
_____________

© 2011 by Author Kathleen Meyer  •  All Rights Reserved 
Website design by
RapidRiver.us