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Foreword
by
Bill McKibben

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Available Everywhere!
—paperback & ebook—

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Make the world a better place,
buy from your local
Mom & Pop/independent bookstore
or, right here, from mine:

Chapter One Book Store

If you’d like it signed,
send me an email with instructions,
and I’ll pop down with my pen.

✭   ✭   ✭

Audio Book of 3rd Edition.
Order from
Tantor Audio

Stacks Image 2586

Read by Khristine Hvam!
To meet her, click on the roll of
T.P.

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~    ~   ~    ~    ~    ~   ~   ~    ~    ~   ~    ~    ~   ~

Synopsis

The Fourth Edition, with a foreword by world renown author and activist Bill McKibben, is jam-packed with new information for outdoor enthusiasts of every stripe. Techniques, women’s gear, methods of water purification, backwoods’ toilet products, packing-it-out systems. How to Shit in the Woods was hailed in its first edition as “the most important environmental book of the decade” by Books of the Southwest, and in its second as “the real shit” by the late, great, outdoor photographer Galen Rowell. This bestselling guide, called the “backpacker’s bible,” has sold more than 3 million copies in eight languages. Author Kathleen Meyer continues pioneering the way with her inimitable voice—at once humorous, irreverent, and direct—examining the latest techniques for graceful backcountry elimination, and answering a desperate cry from nature concerning environmental precautions in our ever-shrinking wilds.
         World changes come fast and furious, and in the backcountry it is no different. The practice of “packing-it-out,” adopted to protect high use areas and fragile eco-systems, is here to stay. We are now often urged to haul our poop home. Or with increasing frequency, the whole business is mandatory. To assist with all this responsible human waste disposal, Meyer’s new edition features the latest in product innovations, from classy high-tech to inexpensive do-it-yourself. She covers the most current solutions to the health risks of drinking straight from wilderness waterways; presents a raft of natural substitutes for the purist swearing off toilet tissue; and offers a wealth of new recommendations for ladies who must make do without a loo.
         This down-to-earth guide has been employed as a training aid for scout troops, outdoor schools, and wilderness programs for inner-city youth; for rangers with the U.S. Forest Service, National Park Service, and Bureau of Land Management; as well as for whitewater rafting guides, backcountry outfitters, and members of the military.
         Years of rowing urbanites down whitewater rivers honed Meyer’s squatting skills and assured her she “wasn’t alone in the klutz department.” Her shameless discussion of a once-shameful activity, her erudite examination of its associated vocabulary, and her unapologetic promotion of its colorful vernacular make
How to Shit in the Woods essential—and vastly entertaining—reading for anyone who’s ever paused at the edge of the forest and pondered: “Where do I go to go?”
How to Shit in the Woods: An Environmentally Sound Approach to a Lost Art
BESTSELLING OUTDOOR GUIDE



More than 3 million copies sold, in 8 languages.

Chapter 1, “Anatomy of a Crap,” has been anthologized in Funny Trail Tales alongside humorists Mark Twain, A.A. Milne, Garrison Keillor, Dave Barry, Tim Cahill, Patrick McManus . . .
Ten Speed Press, a division of Crown Books and Random House, 1989, 1994, 2011, 2020 (112 pages)
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Praise . . .

“Kathleen Meyer is a treasure: In these days of
disappearing wilderness and an unlivable
hot earth, I can’t imagine a more trusted guide
for the woods and wild. ”
 

Doug Peacock, author of Walking
It Off: A Veteran’s Chronicle of
War and Wilderness
,
and so many more.

“As a philosophy of life built on the profound
interconnection between self and nature,
How to Shit in the Woods is clearly
the definitive text on the subject.”
 

Gail D. Storey, author of the award-
winning outdoor memoir
I Promise
Not to Suffer: A Fool for Love
Hikes the Pacific Crest Trail

“Kathleen Meyer has contributed to environmental
awareness while lending a grand old English word
the respectability that it hasn’t had
since Chaucer’s day.”
     

Frank Graham, Jr., Audubon magazine

“Meyers little book should be essential reading
for everyone who goes into the outdoors . . . and on
the curriculum of every school where
outdoor education is taught.”

Cameron McNeish, British author, mountaineer, lecturer, and broadcaster

“Hey, this is the real shit!”     

         — Galen Rowell, the late great outdoor
photographer and writer

“I was convulsed! Everyone loves shit, really.”

Malachy McCourt, actor, raconteur extraordinaire, and author of the New York Times bestseller, A Monk Swimming

“Victorian sensibilities and euphemisms be
damned, Kathleen Meyer, river runner and
longtime outdoors woman, has something
important to say about a tittering subject.”

Grace Brown, Women’s Outdoor Journal

“Bully for Kathleen Meyer. [Her] writing is earthy
and her humor dry.
How to Shit in the Woods often
takes poetic flight in the oddest of places. In Meyer’s hands, so to speak, shit can be sublime.”

Andy Smetanka, Missoula Independent

“This book should be on the reference shelf or camping
kit of every canoe and safari operator, angler, rock climber, and wanderer in the wilderness . . . [it] may
help insure that our wild places remain
uncontaminated for the benefit of
generations to come.”
     

Geof Calvert and Verity Mundy (from Bulawayo, Zimbabwe), The Farmer

“The ultimate title in the genre.”        

Penthouse magazine

“Good, clear, pertinent stuff—I wish every how-to book were written like this one!”

Patricia Poore, Garbage magazine

“Doesn’t take the reader long to get used
to THAT word, or to concede that the well-prepared
book is a critical woodcraft manual.”
     

Lee Straight, BC Outdoors

“This is a great book! I wholeheartedly agree with
Ms. Meyer’s environmental concerns.”
     

Linda Svendsen, Director of Boojum Expeditions

“Luckily, people such as Meyer are ready to tell us
how to deal with this problem and, even luckier, the solution is not complicated.”
    

Ben Ling, Salt Lake City Press

“There is no easy way to say this: You have to learn
how to properly defecate in the woods . . . . Fortunately, river guide Kathleen Meyer is less squeamish
than the rest of us
, and has written an authoritative
and entertaining book.”
   

USA Today

“Going where no one has gone before is more than
just the Star Trek motto . . . Meyer leaves no stones unturned explaining the dos and don’ts of proper
excretory techniques.”
    

Roger Vargo, Ecological 4-Wheeling

“This is the most important environmental book
of the decade.” [1989]
     

W. David Laird, Books
of the Southwest [1989]

“This well-written little manual deals factually and
honestly with all the problems of personal sanitation
in the out-of-doors.”
    

Robert Fulghum, Seattle Times

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Available Everywhere!

✭   ✭   ✭

Find Synopsis at the bottom.

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Forward
by
Bill McKibben

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How to Shit in the Woods:
An Environmentally Sound Approach to a Lost Art

BESTSELLING OUTDOOR GUIDE



More than 3 million copies sold, in 8 languages.

Chapter 1, “Anatomy of a Crap,” has been anthologized in Funny Trail Tales alongside humorists Mark Twain, A.A. Milne, Garrison Keillor, Dave Barry, Tim Cahill, Patrick McManus . . .
_______________
Ten Speed Press
, a division of Crown Books and Random House,
1989, 1994, 2011, 2020. (112 pages)
Stacks Image 3240

Make the world a better place,
buy from your local
Mom & Pop/ independent bookstore
or, right here, from mine:

Chapter One Book Store

If you’d like it signed,
send me an email with instructions,
and I’ll pop down with my pen.

Stacks Image 2806

Available Everywhere!
—paperback & ebook—

✭   ✭   ✭

Find Synopsis at the bottom.

Stacks Image 3227

Foreword
by
Bill McKibben

Stacks Image 3108

How to Shit in the Woods:
An Environmentally Sound
Approach to a Lost Art

BESTSELLING OUTDOOR GUIDE




More than 3 million copies sold, in 8 languages.

Chapter 1, “Anatomy of a Crap,” has been anthologized in Funny Trail Tales alongside humorists Mark Twain, A.A. Milne, Garrison Keillor, Dave Barry, Tim Cahill, Patrick McManus . . .
_______________
Ten Speed Press
, a division of Crown Books and Random House, 1989, 1994, 2011, 2020. (112 pages)
Stacks Image 3249

Make the world a better place,
buy from your local
Mom & Pop/ independent bookstore
or, right here, from mine:

Chapter One Book Store

If you’d like it signed,
send me an email with instructions,
and I’ll pop down with my pen.

✭   ✭   ✭

Audio Book of 3rd Edition.
Order from
Tantor Audio

Stacks Image 3126

Read by Khristine Hvam!
To meet her, click on
T.P.

Stacks Image 3130
Praise . . .

“Kathleen Meyer is a treasure: In these days of disappearing wilderness and an unlivable hot earth, I can’t imagine a more trusted guide for the woods and wild.” 

Doug Peacock, author of Walking
It Off: A Veteran’s Chronicle of
War and Wilderness
,
and so many more.

“Kathleen Meyer has contributed
to environmental awareness while lending a grand old English word the respectability that it hasn’t had since Chaucer’s day.”
     

Frank Graham, Jr., Audubon magazine

“As a philosophy of life built on the profound interconnection between self and nature, How to Shit in the Woods is clearly the definitive text on the subject.” 

Gail D. Storey, author of the
award-winning outdoor memoir
I Promise Not to Suffer: A
Fool for Love Hikes the
Pacific Crest Trail

“Meyers little book should be essential reading for everyone who goes into the outdoors . . . and on the curriculum of every school where outdoor education is taught.”

Cameron McNeish, British author, mountaineer, lecturer, and broadcaster

“Hey, this is the real shit!”

            — Galen Rowell, the late great outdoor photographer and writer

“I was convulsed! Everyone loves shit, really.”

Malachy McCourt, actor, raconteur extraordinaire, and author of the New York Times bestseller, A Monk Swimming

“Victorian sensibilities and euphemisms be damned, Kathleen Meyer, river runner and longtimeoutdoorswoman, has something important to say about a tittering subject.”        

Grace Brown, Women’s Outdoor Journal

“Bully for Kathleen Meyer. [Her] writing is earthy and her humor dry. How to Shit in the Woods often takes poetic flight in the oddest of places. In Meyer’s hands, so to speak, shit can be sublime.”

Andy Smetanka, Missoula Independent

“This book should be on the reference shelf or camping kit of every canoe and safari operator, angler, rock climber, and wanderer in the wilderness . . . [it] may help insure that our wild places remain uncontaminated for the benefit of generations to come.”     

Geof Calvert and Verity Mundy (from Bulawayo, Zimbabwe), The Farmer

“The ultimate title in the genre.”

Penthouse magazine

“Good, clear, pertinent stuff—I wish every how-to book were written
like this one!”

Patricia Poore, Garbage magazine

“Doesn’t take the reader long to get used to THAT word, or to concede that the well-prepared book is a critical woodcraft manual.”     

Lee Straight, BC Outdoors

“This is a great book! I whole-heartedly agree with Ms. Meyer’s environmental concerns.”     

Linda Svendsen, Director of Boojum Expeditions

“Luckily, people such as Meyer are ready to tell us how to deal with this problem and, even luckier, the solution is not complicated.”    

Ben Ling, Salt Lake City Press

“There is no easy way to say this: You have to learn how to properly defecate in the woods . . . . Fortunately, river guide Kathleen Meyer is less squeamish than the rest of us, and has written an authoritative and entertaining book.”   

USA Today

“Going where no one has gone before is more than just the Star Trek motto . . . Meyer leaves no stones unturned explaining the dos and don’ts of proper excretory techniques.”    

Roger Vargo, Ecological
4-Wheeling

“This is the most important environmental book of the decade.” [1989]     

W. David Laird, Books of the Southwest

“This well-written little manual deals factually and honestly with all the problems of personal sanitation in the out-of-doors.”    

Robert Fulghum, Seattle Times

Stacks Image 3201

Synopsis

Now available, the Fourth Edition, with a foreword by Bill McKibben, is jam-packed with new information for outdoor enthusiasts of every stripe. Especially, new women’s gear. How to Shit in the Woods was hailed in its first edition as “the most important environmental book of the decade” by Books of the Southwest, and in its second as “the real shit” by the late, great, outdoor photographer Galen Rowell. This bestselling guide, called the “backpacker’s bible,” has sold more than 3 million copies in eight languages. Author Kathleen Meyer continues pioneering the way with her inimitable voice—at once humorous, irreverent, and direct—examining the latest techniques for graceful backcountry elimination, and answering a desperate cry from nature concerning environmental precautions in our ever-shrinking wilds.
         World changes come fast and furious, and in the backcountry it is no different. The practice of “packing-it-out,” adopted to protect high use areas and fragile eco-systems, is here to stay. We are now often urged to haul our poop home. Or with increasing frequency, the whole business is mandatory. To assist with all this responsible human waste disposal, Meyer’s new edition features the latest in product innovations, from classy high-tech to inexpensive do-it-yourself. She covers the most current solutions to the health risks of drinking straight from wilderness waterways; presents a raft of natural substitutes for the purist swearing off toilet tissue; and offers a wealth of new recommendations for ladies who must make do without a loo.
         This down-to-earth guide has been employed as a training aid for scout troops, outdoor schools, and wilderness programs for inner-city youth; for rangers with the U.S. Forest Service, National Park Service, and Bureau of Land Management; as well as for whitewater rafting guides, backcountry outfitters, and members of the military.
         Years of rowing urbanites down whitewater rivers honed Meyer’s squatting skills and assured her she “wasn’t alone in the klutz department.” Her shameless discussion of a once-shameful activity, her erudite examination of its associated vocabulary, and her unapologetic promotion of its colorful vernacular make
How to Shit in the Woods essential—and vastly entertaining—reading for anyone who’s ever paused at the edge of the forest and pondered: “Where do I go to go?”
Praise . . .

“Kathleen Meyer is a treasure: In these days of disappearing wilderness and an unlivable hot earth, I can’t imagine a more trusted guide for the woods and wild.” 

Doug Peacock, author of Walking
It Off: A Veteran’s Chronicle of
War and Wilderness
,
and so many more.

“Kathleen Meyer has contributed to environmental awareness while lending a grand old English word the respectability that it hasn’t had since Chaucer’s day.”     

Frank Graham, Jr., Audubon magazine

“As a philosophy of life built on the profound interconnection between self and nature, How to Shit in the Woods is clearly the definitive text on the subject.” 

Gail D. Storey, author of the
award-winning outdoor memoir
I Promise Not to Suffer: A
Fool for Love Hikes the
Pacific Crest Trail

“Meyers little book should be essential reading for everyone who goes into the outdoors . . . and on the curriculum of every school where outdoor education is taught.”

Cameron McNeish, British author, mountaineer, lecturer, and broadcaster

“Hey, this is the real shit!”

            — Galen Rowell, the late great outdoor photographer and writer

“I was convulsed! Everyone loves shit, really.”

Malachy McCourt, actor, raconteur
extraordinaire, and author of the
New York Times bestseller,
A Monk Swimming

“Victorian sensibilities and euphemisms be damned, Kathleen Meyer, river runner and longtime outdoors woman, has something important to say about a tittering subject.”        

Grace Brown, Women’s Outdoor Journal

“Bully for Kathleen Meyer. [Her] writing is earthy and her humor dry. How to Shit in the Woods often takes poetic flight in the oddest of places. In Meyer’s hands, so to speak, shit can be sublime.”

Andy Smetanka, Missoula Independent,

“This book should be on the reference shelf or camping kit of every canoe and safari operator, angler, rock climber, and wanderer in the wilderness . . . [it] may help insure that our wild places remain uncontaminated for the benefit of generations to come.”     

Geof Calvert and Verity Mundy (from Bulawayo, Zimbabwe), The Farmer

“The ultimate title in the genre.”

Penthouse magazine

“Good, clear, pertinent stuff—I wish every how-to book were written like this one!”

Patricia Poore, Garbage magazine

“Doesn’t take the reader long to get used to THAT word, or to concede that the well-prepared book
is a critical woodcraft manual.”
     

Lee Straight, BC Outdoors

“This is a great book! I whole-heartedly agree with Ms. Meyer’s environmental concerns.”     

Linda Svendsen, Director of Boojum Expeditions

“Luckily, people such as Meyer are ready to tell us how to deal with this problem and, even luckier,
the solution is not complicated.”
    

Ben Ling, Salt Lake City Press

“There is no easy way to say this: You have to learn how to properly defecate in the woods . . . . Fortunately, river guide Kathleen Meyer is less squeamish than the rest of us, and has written an authoritative and entertaining book.”   

USA Today

“Going where no one has gone before is more than just the Star Trek motto . . . Meyer leaves no stones unturned explaining the dos and don’ts of proper excretory techniques.”    

Roger Vargo, Ecological
4-Wheeling

“This is the most important environmental book of the decade.” [1989]     

W. David Laird, Books of the Southwest

“This well-written little manual deals factually and honestly with all the problems of personal sanitation in the out-of-doors.”    

Robert Fulghum, Seattle Times

Stacks Image 3203

Audio Book of 3rd Edition.
Order from
Tantor Audio

Stacks Image 3142

Read by Khristine Hvam!
To meet her, click on
T.P.

Stacks Image 3146

Synopsis

Now available, the Fourth Edition, with a foreword by world renown author and activist Bill McKibben, is jam-packed with new information for outdoor enthusiasts of every stripe. Especially, new women’s gear. How to Shit in the Woods was hailed in its first edition as “the most important environmental book of the decade” by Books of the Southwest, and in its second as “the real shit” by the late, great, outdoor photographer Galen Rowell. This bestselling guide, called the “backpacker’s bible,” has sold more than 3 million copies in eight languages. Author Kathleen Meyer continues pioneering the way with her inimitable voice—at once humorous, irreverent, and direct—examining the latest techniques for graceful backcountry elimination, and answering a desperate cry from nature concerning environmental precautions in our ever-shrinking wilds.
         World changes come fast and furious, and in the backcountry it is no different. The practice of “packing-it-out,” adopted to protect high use areas and fragile eco-systems, is here to stay. We are now often urged to haul our poop home. Or with increasing frequency, the whole business is mandatory. To assist with all this responsible human waste disposal, Meyer’s new edition features the latest in product innovations, from classy high-tech to inexpensive do-it-yourself. She covers the most current solutions to the health risks of drinking straight from wilderness waterways; presents a raft of natural substitutes for the purist swearing off toilet tissue; and offers a wealth of new recommendations for ladies who must make do without a loo.
         This down-to-earth guide has been employed as a training aid for scout troops, outdoor schools, and wilderness programs for inner-city youth; for rangers with the U.S. Forest Service, National Park Service, and Bureau of Land Management; as well as for whitewater rafting guides, backcountry outfitters, and members of the military.
         Years of rowing urbanites down whitewater rivers honed Meyer’s squatting skills and assured her she “wasn’t alone in the klutz department.” Her shameless discussion of a once-shameful activity, her erudite examination of its associated vocabulary, and her unapologetic promotion of its colorful vernacular make
How to Shit in the Woods essential—and vastly entertaining—reading for anyone who’s ever paused at the edge of the forest and pondered: “Where do I go to go?”

© 2011 by Author Kathleen Meyer  •  All Rights Reserved 
Website design by
RapidRiver.us

© 2011 by Author Kathleen Meyer  •  All Rights Reserved 
Website design by
RapidRiver.us